Social Justice Warrior

Women’s Day ’18 ft. Kimothy Joy

8th March 2018 ♡

Today, as we reflect on the astonishing women in our lives, there’s no shortage of stories floating around; from Malala Yousafzai being shot point blank to Lupita Nuyongo’s journey from Political Exile to the Oscars.

But that’s not what I want to share with y’all today.

Today, I’m more interested in the women whose names aren’t transcribed on headlines (yet), who haven’t make the talk show circuit (yet), and who hasn’t written a best selling novel (yet). Don’t get me wrong, for I have infinite admiration for those women as they deserve it, everyday.

Instead, I’m dedicating this article to the woman standing behind you in the grocery line, the mother who smiles at you when your child is throwing a tantrum in public, the grandmother who loves your kids as if they were her own and most importantly, the one reading these words right now.


Because the everyday women in our lives need to be celebrated, too.

Nearly every day, I read stories about women beating the odds, challenging the status quo, and paving the way for our generation to rocket right through a marble ceiling. Yet, we rarely appreciate ourselves, and the “constant” women around us. Thus, on this International Women’s Day, I’d like to share a few reminders on why today, and every day forward, isn’t just for the big names out there. It’s for us.

There are three women closest to my heart. One gave birth to me, the other gave birth to the love of my life and the other gave birth to my sisters (and is my father’s partner in life.) Nevertheless, they all have one thing in common, and that is the love they’re giving me since day one. Moreover, they taught me the value of nurturing others, whilst allowing myself to be nurtured.

Yet, my maternal grandmother (“Dhai’dha Maama“) was the strongest of ’em all.

During my visits, I massaged her legs as she listened to me. Despite being bedridden, her mind was as sharp as a 30 year old. I admired her “can do!” spirit, for she raised my mom, my aunt and two uncles all by herself when my grandfather left to sail across the world. (No hard feelings, Gramps. Glad to have you back.) The word “raised” would not do justice, as it was a deprived household and she worked her fingers to the bone to earn the daily bread. Even after her passing, she continues to inspire me every day, for she was a force of nature amply expressed in physical form and in her spirit.

Recently, a friend told me about his aunt over tea. Our society has been, and is still a patriarchal one. Hence, men were given the opportunity to grow as independent people, while women were expected to groom themselves for marriage. Therefore, his aunt was deprived of further education until she decided to rebel against the norm and got herself to Male’, worked her way till she got herself educated and financially independent. She did get married afterwards (what was initially expected of her), fared abroad and settled down with her family. Now, her daughters are en route to becoming women as ardent as their mother.

So, if you take a moment to listen to the tales of the women around you, you’ll notice that they’re all extraordinary, with a hint (or many) of blood, sweat and tears.

“The women I love and admire for their strength and grace did not get that way because shit worked out. They got that way because shit went wrong and they handled it. They handled it a thousand different ways on a thousand different days, but they handled it. Those women are my superheroes.” – Elizabeth Gilbert

Today, share your story, for you’ll never know how many people you’ll end up inspiring. Because trust me, you have fans. And even though the saying “you can do anything!” is cliché, clichés exists for a reason, right? x

I love y’all, except for the women who pair uggs with pleather.

On a second thought, I love you too. But unless you’re allergic to the real thing or are a vegan, you should not be wearing the cheap substitute for leather.

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